Picture book chronicles Moving Wall coming to Wellsville in 2008

Olean Times-2 months before

The Moving Wall’s visit was hosted by American Legion Post 702 and its arrival, setup and ceremony were chronicled by Denis Dahlgren in a book he presented to the Nathaniel Dike Museum this past week.

A former Wellsville teacher, Dahlgren was part of the committee, organized by the Morrison Hayes Legion Post, to plan the event. He compiled a picture book — “The Moving Wall: Wellsville, N.Y., May 2008” — of more than 100 pages and, on Wednesday, presented a copy to the Thelma Rogers Genealogical and History Society (TRGHS) to be displayed in the Nathaniel Dike Museum.
...br>Post 702 hosted the display of the Moving Wall under the direction of former Commander Nate Scott and Vickie Scott, who was president of the auxiliary.

Both, along with other Post 702 members, were present when Dahlgren presented the book to the society, which oversees the museum.

“Denis Dahlgren was instrumental in anything that we asked during that time, from making additional copies to taking pictures and any odd job that was asked of him, even though he himself was not a veteran,” Vickie Scott said. “His brother served in the Vietnam War and he truly appreciated all that was being put into bringing the wall to Wellsville.”

Scott said the book chronicles “many unforgettable events that took place those four days. To him, Post 702 is eternally grateful.”

Dahlgren, now retired, said COVID-19 and continuing shutdowns gave him the time to go through his photos and other memorabilia and compile the hardcover book.

Marsha Sick, treasurer and newsletter editor for the TRGHS, called the book a “wonderful addition” to the museum.

“It is a great honor, and it is so great for a local person to take time and who has the talent to do this,” she said. “The Legion had such dedication to do something like (host the Wall). It brings a tear to my eye to think of all they do.”

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Almost 20 Percent of Travelers Think It is OK to Travel Now, Less Than That Are Waiting for a Vaccine According to Oliver Wyman Almost 20 Percent of Travelers Think It is OK to Travel Now, Less Than That Are Waiting for a Vaccine According to Oliver Wyman The Moving Wall arrived in Wellsville on May 6, 2008, accompanied by a contingent of Patriot Guard motorcycle riders. It was erected on a ball field in Island Park by volunteers. While in Wellsville, the Wall was guarded day and night by members of area service clubs and the public.

The Moving Wall was devised by John Devitt after he attended the 1982 annual commemoration ceremonies in Washington for Vietnam veterans. He wanted to share his experience with those who did not have the opportunity to go to Washington.

Devitt and other Vietnam veterans volunteered to build the Moving Wall, which went on display for the first time in Tyler, Texas in October 1984.

Two versions of The Moving Wall travel the country from April through November, spending five or six days at each site.

The original Vietnam Memorial Wall in Washington is nearly 500 feet long and in a “V” formation, with one wing pointing to the Washington Memorial and the other pointing to the Lincoln Memorial. It is 10 feet high at its apex and tapers to 8 inches at each end.

It was designed by architectural student Maya Lin when she was an undergraduate at Yale University, after she won a nationwide design contest. The monument in inscribed with the names of the more than 58,000 men and women killed in Vietnam from 1956-75.

The National Park Service estimates that around 3 million people visit the National Vietnam Memorial each year.

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